Heath Insurance

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Health Insurance Annotated Bibliography

Nina Johnson

School of Business, Liberty University

Annotated Bibliography in Health Insurance

Serrate, P. C. F., Rigoli, F., Atun, R., Frenz, P., Garcia, P., de Andrade, L. O. M., & Gomez-Dantes, O. (2014). Health-system reform and universal health coverage in Latin America.

This article examines healthcare reform efforts in South America. The authors look into the context-specific obstacles driving innovation in LAC healthcare systems and the substantiation of healthcare systems policy changes, such as health system governance and leadership, health system funding, resource planning, and provision of services. The authors highlight several key accomplishments based on these research results, including broadened Medicaid of social welfare and medical coverage, extensive coverage of health services predicated on thorough principal health care, enhancements in health results, insurance coverage, and gratification.

Borgonovi, E., & Compagni, A. (2013). They are sustaining universal health coverage: the interaction of social, political, and economic sustainability. Value in health, 16(1), S34-S38.

The article highlights what most experts believe regarding sustainable economic growth when they imagine achieving sustainable development. Nevertheless, it is critical to recognize that sustainability has social and political aspects. According to the strategy commentary and analysis in this article, economic insufficiency could be utilized to subvert political and socially sustainable development. They assert compellingly that assessing management strategies should play a larger role in evaluating financial viability.

Drummond, M., Tarricone, R., & Torbica, A. (2013). Assessing the added value of health technologies: reconciling different perspectives. Value in Health, 16(1), S7-S13.

The article by Drummond, Tarricone, and Torbica discusses the difficulties that UHC structures encounter in providing access to expensive technological innovations. It sheds some light on the connection between health technology appraisal and universal health insurance. The authors highlight the innate pressure that persists among the relevant parties, such as patients, payers, and innovators of new technologies.

Evans, D. B., Marten, R., & Etienne, C. (2012). Universal health coverage is a development issue. The Lancet, 380(9845), 864-865.

Even though social and ecological variables have an influence on health, sustaining and enhancing health is both an aspect and a predictor of sustainability because improved health corresponds significantly to human development. Keeping folks healthy, high-quality healthcare mechanisms with universal coverage safeguard people from ailments, promote economic growth and combat poverty. They also help maintain peaceful coexistence by assuring the citizens that services are accessible in the circumstance of illness. As a result, one of the prerequisites for sustainable growth must be to assist countries in moving nearer to universal health care.

Frank, J. (2015). Leading the way towards universal health coverage: a call to action. The Lancet, 385(9975), 1352-1358.

The invite to intervention underscores the next stages that could assist Latin America, and the remainder of the undeveloped nations achieve the objective of universal health care. Because of the complexity and scale of Latin America’s hurdles, current policy inventions, and distributed health complications with the poorest countries, teachings from South America could be implemented to other nations and wider conversations of global health restructuring.

Garrison, L. P. (2013). Universal health coverage—big thinking versus big data. Value in Health, 16(1), S1-S3.

This is the first of 8 articles in a special edition highlighting the variety of methods and methods used by social sciences to comprehend and satisfy the emerging obstacles of a progressively intricate and worldwide healthcare setting. All in all, the new issue focuses on the many aspects and concerns surrounding the broadly sought-after objective of Universal health care. The publications primarily discuss big thoughts predicated on a small number of “attributes,” that is, commonly kept suppositions regarding actions, often premised on a comprehensive evaluation of our understanding.

Horton, R. (2014). Offline: WHO offers a new future for sustainable development. The Lancet, 383(9932), 1872.

The article is about WHO responding to incredible demand from nations by emphasizing UHC post-2015. Dr Chan has defied the conservative politics of some funders who view Universal health care as a philosophy rather than a scheme that can be implemented. WHO also establishes four goals. To begin, the goal is to “accomplish the MDGs for infant, kid, and maternity care, as well as major infectious diseases.” “Confront the hardship of noncommunicable, concussions, and psychiatric disorder,” says the second sub-goal. The third goal is to “improve healthcare quality with financial threat safety.”

Horton, R., & Das, P. (2014). Universal health coverage: not why, what, or when–but how?. Lancet (London, England), 385(9974), 1156-1157.

The debate over universal health coverage has been on the winning end and is gaining rapidly. Still, the assignment of providing Universal health care to the nations in need of adaptable healthcare systems has only just begun. But a slight headway has been made in the domain of complicated policy formulation. UHC is no longer a question of “how, which one, or even when.” It is today a matter of “how.” The major disparity for nations attempting to provide UHC is connectivity to a library of understanding, insight, and funds aid in decision-making.

Kruk, M. E. (2013). Universal health coverage: a policy whose time has come. BMJ, 347. Health care insurance is both the right and logical idea to do. It moves nations closer to acknowledging a person’s right to health, a worldwide dedication made yet still unmet in many nations. Furthermore, it is an effective method of financing healthcare. Getting more health out of healthcare investment portfolios reduces clients’ economic strain. Individuals in middle and low nations are progressively demanding good healthcare, according to a current study of Asian and African survey participants. This growing attention comes as low-income nations’ economy expands and taxpayers demand more from their authorities, such as a greater social welfare system.

Reich, M. R., Harris, J., Ikegami, N., Maeda, A., Cashin, C., Araujo, E. C., & Evans, T. G. (2016). Moving towards universal health coverage: lessons from 11 country studies. The Lancet, 387(10020), 811-816.

This book summarizes the thoughts and feelings of 11 nations in trying to implement initiatives and approaches to accomplish and sustain global health insurance: Bangladesh, Brazil, Ethiopia, France, Ghana, Indonesia, Japan, Peru, Thailand, Turkey, and Vietnam. These nations portray a wide range of geographic and economic circumstances. Still, they have all dedicated themselves to Universal health care as a major strategic ambition, are pursuing it in various aspects, and are at various phases of attaining or maintaining it.

McKee, M., Balabanova, D., Basu, S., Ricciardi, W., & Stuckler, D. (2013). Universal health coverage: a quest for all countries but under threat in some. Value in Health, 16(1), S39-S45.

McKee et al. (2013) examine the prospective fragile nature of UHC by combining prior analysis of data with huge thoughts regarding historical events. This article explains how many advanced and developing nations have accomplished universal care. They trawl through the information to track the following five important resources that facilitate UHC: the grit of labor unions and the left-wing parties that portray it and access to resources.

Dellinger, R. P., Levy, M. M., Rhodes, A., Annane, D., Gerlach, H., Opal, S. M., & Moreno, R. (2013). Surviving Sepsis Campaign: international guidelines for management of severe sepsis and septic shock, 2012. Intensive care medicine, 39(2), 165-228.

A workable health system is critical to achieving health insurance, and this has been the subject of current declarations by activist groups and other groups around the world. The central factor for low- and middle-income nations’ health systems is providing greater financial security for households. The vital funding question would be whether the majority of the people will pay.

Missoni, E. (2013). Understanding the impact of global trade liberalization on health systems pursuing universal health coverage. Value in Health, 16(1), S14-S18.

Missoni’s article is a reflective policy piece investigating the future effects of the global economic reform on UHC. The article examines the potential negative effects of world trade on every of WHO’s six health framework basic components: customer service, integrated health, details, medical supplies, immunizations, innovations, funding, and management and leadership. While commerce and understanding synergies, such as the advantage of reduced, first-line antiretroviral therapy for HIV, could indeed support developing nations, the article recognizes several potential negative consequences.

Mulley, A., Evans, T., & Binagwaho, A. (2013). Meeting the challenges of providing universal health coverage. BMJ, 347.

Inclusive and inexpensive universal medical insurance, as well as advancements in individual’s health, could be attained by simply broadening and ramping up history’s “one-piece suit all” patient care designs. According to the 2010 World Health Organization report, 20-40% of existing medical spending is squandered. This squandering stems from both the failings to provide treatment safely and efficiently, as well as the overexploitation of services that surpasses what individuals would desire if they were notified of the options and the results.

Savedoff, W. D., de Ferranti, D., Smith, A. L., & Fan, V. (2012). Political and economic aspects of the transition to universal health coverage. The Lancet, 380(9845), 924-932.

This paper investigates the backgrounds of universal health insurance in 4 nations: Sweden, Japan, Chile, and Malaysia. It demonstrates that domestic stresses for normative medical access are extraordinarily diverse, pervasive, and tenacious. Second, global medical insurance is always associated with a substantial government role, although the involvement can take many shapes. Thirdly, the route to global health insurance is ad hoc, resulting from bargaining rather than layout. Eventually, universal medical insurance is achieved gradually and gradually over time.

Temkin, L. S. (2014). Universal Health Coverage: Solution or Siren? Some Preliminary Thoughts. Journal of Applied Philosophy, 31(1), 1-22.

This article relates explicitly to the burgeoning wave of support for the notion that UHC ought to be available to all people, including those in developing nations. While the writer supports the ultimate goal of achieving UHC worldwide as early as possible, the article conveys Temkin’s concerns about “whether the world’s wealthy nations, or organizations such as the World Health Organization, should be pressing the world’s poorest nations to take whatever measures are critical to achieve that objective.”

Campbell, J., Buchan, J., Cometto, G., David, B., Dussault, G., Fogstad, H., Fronteira, I., Lozano, R., Nyonator, F., Pablos-Méndez, A., Quain, E. E., Starrs, A., & Tangcharoensathien, V. (2013). Human resources for health and universal health coverage: fostering equity and effective coverage. Bulletin of the World Health Organization, 91(11), 853–863. https://doi.org/10.2471/BLT.13.118729

Everybody has the right to health, and domestic universal health care schemes must encompass checks and balances from the start to guarantee that providers (private and public) run the service equitably. Financial threat safeguarding is insufficient to guarantee quality care. Patient encounters should be considered when assessing the level of services. To resolve the incomplete MDGs and guarantee the sustainable growth of the rewards, national health and wellbeing planning must prioritize equity and inclusion of the most vulnerable groups.

Attaran, A., & Capron, A. M. (2014). Universal health coverage and health laws. Lancet, 383(9911), 25.

According to Attaran and Capron (2014), the WHO has exacerbated the issue by quietly discontinuing its IDHL, a compendium of health regulations that started in 1948. Moreover, for months, the webpage has been “momentarily” inaccessible. The authors urge WHO to update its catalogue of health regulations and provide aimed recommendations on legal best practices to achieve universal health insurance that it has an express obligation to do under the WHO Constitution but has sadly overlooked.

Fattore, G., & Tediosi, F. (2013). The importance of values in shaping how health systems gover nance and management can support universal health coverage. Value in Health, 16(1), S19-S23.

A notable example of a conceptual thought piece is Fattore and Tadiosi’s article on cultural norms and their involvement in governance regarding UHC. They present a plausible hypothesis for how distinct underpinning cultural norms can result in societies choosing governance and management frameworks that are somewhat cordial to UHC. They differentiate between “administration” and “leadership,” with the former focusing on operating processes and the latter on how rules and practices are established and implemented.

Ooms, G., Marten, R., Waris, A., Hammonds, R., Mulumba, M., & Friedman, E. A. (2014). Great expectations for the World Health Organization: a Framework Convention on Global Health to achieve universal health coverage. Public health, 128(2), 173-178.

Constructing a reform plan for the World Health Organization (WHO) necessitates comprehension of the institution’s position within the larger global healthcare system and the goals of that larger global health scheme. This paper focuses on a single goal: accomplishing universal health insurance. The goal is to explain why attaining UHC necessitates something more like a Framework Convention on Global Health, why WHO is in a rare position to welcome in an FCGH, and what particular initiatives would assist WHO presume this responsibility.

References

Attaran, A., & Capron, A. M. (2014). Universal health coverage and health laws. Lancet, 383(9911), 25.

Borgonovie, E., & Compagni, A. (2013). They are Sustaining Universal Health Coverage: The Interaction of Social, Political, and Economic Sustainability. Value in Health, 16(1), S34-S38.

Campbell, J., Buchan, J., Cometto, G., David, B., Dussault, G., Fogstad, H., Fronteira, I., Lozano, R., Nyonator, F., Pablos-Méndez, A., Quain, E. E., Starrs, A., & Tangcharoensathien, V. (2013). Human resources for health and universal health coverage: fostering equity and effective coverage. Bulletin of the World Health Organization, 91(11), 853–863. https://doi.org/10.2471/BLT.13.118729

Dellinger, R. P., Levy, M. M., Rhodes, A., Annane, D., Gerlach, H., Opal, S. M., & Moreno, R. (2013). Surviving Sepsis Campaign: international guidelines for management of severe sepsis and septic shock, 2012. Intensive care medicine, 39(2), 165-228.

Drummond, M., Tarricone, R., & Torbica, A. (2013). Assessing the added value of health technologies: reconciling different perspectives. Value in Health, 16(1), S7-S13.

Evans, D. B., Marten, R., & Etienne, C. (2012). Universal health coverage is a development issue. The Lancet, 380(9845), 864-865.

Fattore, G., & Tediosi, F. (2013). The importance of values in shaping how health systems governance and management can support universal health coverage. Value in Health, 16(1), S19-S23.

Frank, J. (2015). Leading the way towards universal health coverage: a call to action. The Lancet, 385(9975), 1352-1358.

Garrison, L. P. (2013). Universal health coverage—big thinking versus big data. Value in Health, 16(1), S1-S3.

Horton, R. (2014). Offline: WHO offers a new future for sustainable development. The Lancet, 383(9932), 1872.

Horton, R., & Das, P. (2014). Universal health coverage: not why, what, or when–but how?. Lancet (London, England), 385(9974), 1156-1157.

Kruk, M. E. (2013). Universal health coverage: a policy whose time has come. BMJ, 347.

McKee, M., Balabanova, D., Basu, S., Ricciardi, W., & Stuckler, D. (2013). Universal health coverage: a quest for all countries but under threat in some. Value in Health, 16(1), S39-S45.

Missoni, E. (2013). Understanding the impact of global trade liberalization on health systems pursuing universal health coverage. Value in Health, 16(1), S14-S18.

Mulley, A., Evans, T., & Binagwaho, A. (2013). Meeting the challenges of providing universal health coverage. BMJ, 347.

Ooms, G., Marten, R., Waris, A., Hammonds, R., Mulumba, M., & Friedman, E. A. (2014). Great expectations for the World Health Organization: a Framework Convention on Global Health to achieve universal health coverage. Public health, 128(2), 173-178.

Reich, M. R., Harris, J., Ikegami, N., Maeda, A., Cashin, C., Araujo, E. C., & Evans, T. G. (2016). Moving towards universal health coverage: lessons from 11 country studies. The Lancet, 387(10020), 811-816.

Savedoff, W. D., de Ferranti, D., Smith, A. L., & Fan, V. (2012). Political and economic aspects of the transition to universal health coverage. The Lancet, 380(9845), 924-932.

Serrate, P. C. F., Rigoli, F., Atun, R., Frenz, P., Garcia, P., de Andrade, L. O. M., & Gomez-Dantes, O. (2014). Health-system reform and universal health coverage in Latin America.

Temkin, L. S. (2014). Universal Health Coverage: Solution or Siren? Some Preliminary Thoughts. Journal of Applied Philosophy, 31(1), 1-22.

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